TSI Blog

We need to raise employee engagement levels

February 13th, 2013 by Gary Cattermole

Latest employee engagement figures from CIPD do not make great reading

The latest report from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (Winter 2012/13) shows that 35% of employees are engaged but the majority (61%) remain neutral.  4% of respondents are disengaged.

In comparison to twelve months ago there is a very slight downward change, 36%, 60% and 3% respectively.

The summer of 2012 offered the high point in terms of overall employee engagement at 39% (with just 3% disengaged) but we now find that scores are now inline with Winter 11/12.

The highlights (although not at all surprising) of the latest report are that micro organisations (between 2 and 9 employees) have typically higher levels of engagement as opposed to large organisations (more than 250 employees) – 60% compared with 31%.  Although small organisations (between 10 and 49 employees) have the highest level of disengaged employees at 6% compared with 1% for micro and 5% for large businesses.

The extent to which employees are engaged at work, by gender, sector and size of organisation (%)

CIPD Winter 12/13 Engaged Neutral Disengaged
All 35 61 4
Men 33 62 5
Women 37 60 4
Voluntary Sector 41 56 3
Private Sector 37 59 4
Public Sector 29 67 5
Micro Businesses 60 39 1
Small Businesses 44 50 6
Medium Businesses 38 58 5
Large Businesses 31 64 5

With the advent of (Government backed) initiatives such as Engage for Success and a considerably higher profile for employee engagement – these scores are worrying.  The issue right now, for many, is how can we raise employee engagement levels?

Given the economic background we are being asked more and more for practical advice on employee engagement that doesn’t resort to wide scale costly engagement initiatives.  We do advocate the approach of using simple techniques to drive up engagement but recommend ensuring that these are ‘joined up’ to your wider employee engagement remit – so you can easily track and monitor their positive effects.

Below, we offer some simple, practical steps an organisation can take:

Employee Engagement - Things I Love

PRACTICAL EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT EXCERCISES:

Use the diagram above as a group exercise for finding out what things you could do to better engage and inspire your people.  Place the common elements at the intersection of the circles as these are the strongest.  Communicate the results and build the ideas into your engagement efforts (Remember when communicating: swap ‘I’ for ‘We’).

Consider setting up a ‘What on earth?’ group, whenever anyone working within your organisation comes across a policy or process that is duplicated, convoluted or just plain silly! This group has the authority and skill to modify or remove that policy or process.

Give your customers and suppliers a voice – setup an exercise whereby groups of your customers and suppliers come into your business to talk with your employees. This exercise is ideal to engage your back office and support staff who rarely benefit from external perspectives.

Let us help you increase employee engagement within your organisation, call us on 01255 850051 or click here to drop us an email.

Written by Gary Cattermole
Gary Cattermole is a Director at The Survey Initiative, a dedicated employee research organisation devoted to helping its clients gain insight and understanding into what drives employee engagement in their business. Gary has extensive expertise and experience in a range of employee research techniques from employees surveys and 360 degree feedback to workshop facilitation and action planning sessions, working with a diverse range of clients such as EPSON, Telegraph Media Group, Natural History Museum, AVEVA and Accor. Gary is an avid sports fan, in particular table tennis and football. Visit http://www.surveyinitiative.co.uk for more information.

4 responses

Posted by: We need to raise employee engagement levels | The Survey Initiative | Employee Engagement – The Inside Story | Scoop.it
February 13, 2013

[...] Latest employee engagement figures from CIPD do not make great readingThe latest report from the Chartered Institute of Professional Development (Winter 2012/13 1) shows that 35% of employees are engaged but the majority (61%) remain neutral. 4% of respondents are disengaged.  [...]

Posted by: We need to raise employee engagement levels | The Survey Initiative | Is Perfect Employee Performance Possible? | Scoop.it
February 14, 2013

[...] Latest employee engagement figures from CIPD do not make great readingThe latest report from the Chartered Institute of Professional Development (Winter 2012/13 1) shows that 35% of employees are engaged but the majority (61%) remain neutral. 4% of respondents are disengaged. In comparison to twelve months ago there is a very slight downward change, 36%, 60% and 3% respectively. The summer of 2012 offered the high point in terms of overall employee engagementat 39% (with just 3% disengaged) but we now find that scores are now inline with Winter 11/12.  [...]

Posted by: We need to raise employee engagement levels | The Survey Initiative « The Power of Numbers in Marketing
February 14, 2013

[...] on http://www.surveyinitiative.co.uk Like this:LikeBe the first to like this. ▶ No Responses /* 0) { [...]

Posted by: We need to raise employee engagement levels | The Survey Initiative | Engaging Employees for A Great Customer Experience | Scoop.it
February 25, 2013

[...] It'snot good news. The latest employee engagement figures from CIPD do not make great reading. The report from the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development (Winter 2012/13 1) shows that 35% of employees are engaged but the majority (61%) remain neutral. 4% of respondents are disengaged.  [...]

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